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Cheap Eats

Reducing our living costs is on my mind more than ever, as it’s a mere three months until D takes on his new role as a trainee minister.  We’ve managed just fine on one income as D’s current IT work pays well, but next year we have quite a drop in salary to wear as a family.

We’re cool with that.  Quite frankly, if you are making loads of money as a minister, there’s something very wrong going on!  But we know that making do on less will take some adjustment for us.

We had several options of where D could do his training, and we think we’ve got the place that is the best fit for D, the congregation and for our family.  I’m not revealing where we are going until everything is signed on the dotted line, but it’s somewhere very small in the South Island.  Two reasons we like the place are that it’s cheap to live there (compared to the other places we were offered), and is small enough to walk or cycle almost everywhere, so we hope to use the car much less.  I’d like to think that these two things alone will significantly help us adjust to life on D’s new income.

Our food budget is one area that I’m constantly trying to lower as much as possible, which at times feels like a losing battle due to the rising cost of food.  I’m not exaggerating: butter has increased in price by 62% (!), milk by 7.9% and vegetables are up 8.9% since last year.

The rise in grocery costs have made me examine the meal plans I create much more carefully.  Meal planning saves precious time wondering what on earth to cook for dinner, and stops needless food waste, but it won’t save you money if you choose recipes with expensive ingredients.  Meals with lots of meat, dairy or out-of-season vegetables will have you swooning in shock at the cash register (or it could be that your check-out operator is Mr Darcy…ahem, I digress).

By being very careful with the recipes I choose and incorporating at least 3-4 meatless dinners a week, I’ve been able to reduce our weekly shop by a 1/3rd, often more.  It’s not rocket science, vegetable-based meals are generally much cheaper.  If you are struggling to make ends meet and have avowed carnivores in the house, personally I’d give them two options: they can either make more money to pay for their food or they can get with the programme.  D and I like most vegetarian meals, which helps us, but there are plenty of delicious meatless meals out there that would please even the most devoted meat-eaters.

A modicum of research on the internet brings a plethora of frugal recipes to your browser, and you are sure to find some that get your mouth watering.  Here are some of our current favourites.

We absolutely love this slow cooker lentil and quinoa chili. In fact, I’d go as far to say as we prefer it to the beef version, am I right D?

Quinoa is pricey here in NZ so I just use more lentils.  Mmmm, this recipe is delicious, makes a boat-load of chili and is inexpensive.  It also takes maybe 5 minutes to prepare, and most of that is opening cans or measuring out stock.

 

This freezer bean and cheese burrito recipe is terrific.  I made 20 burritos which – once frozen – can be popped in the microwave for a quick and easy lunch, or for dinner when I just.cannot.be.arsed.cooking.one.more.thing.

I swap out a can of refried beans (more expensive in NZ than the USA, plus just my personal preference) for a can of chili beans, and use a can of plain tomatoes with some burrito spice instead of ‘Rotel’ (an American brand of tomatoes and chillies).  I also use a cup less cheese – America, you know I love you, but y’all are obsessed with cheese – and they still tasted great.

For my latest batch I used store-bought tortillas.  Normally I would make them myself but we had these left over from a weekend of visitors.  Even with the added extra of store-bought tortillas, I worked out that my 20 tortillas came in at .77c per tortilla.  That’s pretty good!

 

This Corn and Broccoli Rice Casserole needs a bit of tweaking (I use more seasonings and a small sprinkle of cheese) to give it more flavour, but otherwise it is a very frugal and perfectly nice meal.  Depending on the price of broccoli or if there’s some in my garden at the time, this dish can be made for $3-4.

Corn and Broccoli Rice Casserole - so simple and SO delicious! Everyone cleaned their plates - even our picky broccoli haters! Cooked rice, creamed corn, broccoli, onion and garlic topped with butter and crushed Ritz crackers. You might want to double the recipe for this quick side dish - this didn't last long in our house!

image and recipe via Plain Chicken

 

These potato pancakes are very filling with a salad.

 

So there you have it, folks.  Do a little research – search particularly for ‘cheap’, ‘frugal’ or ‘depression-era’ recipes, and you will be sure to find recipes that take your fancy.  Your bank balance will thank you.

 

Hit me up with links to your favourite frugal recipes!

 

 

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A frugal holiday destination: New Plymouth, NZ

One thing that our Dollar Diet has taught D and I is the importance of taking breaks.  As much as I’d like a 3-week break in Fiji, that’s unrealistic for our one-income family.  And – as any parent of small children will tell you – a holiday with small children isn’t much of a holiday at all, so mini-breaks are the way to go.

We recently spent a few days in New Plymouth, which I highly recommend for any family looking for a fun holiday destination on a budget.  We hardly spent a thing during our time there, due to all the free things on offer, making it one of the cheapest mini-breaks we’ve ever had.

New Plymouth is one of New Zealand’s top tourist destinations thanks to it’s proximity to Mount Taranaki and the large number of attractions in and around the city.  You can find out more about what to see and do here, but here’s what we got up to during our time in New Plymouth:

Technically the Tarankai Aviation Transport and Technology Museum (TATATM) is just out of Inglewood, but it’s a short drive from New Plymouth.  TATATM is the sort of museum I just adore.  Run by volunteers on the smell of an oily rag, it doesn’t look exciting on the outside, but inside is a well curated treasure trove of New Zealand’s past.

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Drab on the outside…

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…party on the inside

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You know you’re old when items from your childhood are on display at a museum…

There is plenty for kids to climb on and play with, including a working telephone exchange which kept my kids happy calling from building to building.

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We spent two hours at TATATM and the entrance fee of $16 a family is great value.

We also spent several hours hanging out at the cool Puke Ariki, New Plymouth’s museum, library and information centre all rolled into one.  It’s all FREE.

My tots were particularly taken with the library, which utilised technology well and provided plenty of games to play.

D and I were super-impressed by the relaxed librarians who told us ‘of course it’s okay to eat your lunch here!  You have kids, they need to eat.’  So, so chilled.

We loved the Taranki Cycle Park at Bell Block, which has junior road circuit, complete with traffic lights, roundabouts and pedestrian crossings, along with a BMX track and learners soft-surface pad.  Oh, and it’s FREE.

 

We had a ball at the FREE Brooklands Zoo, which can be found within the grounds of Pukekura Park, one of New Plymouth’s main attractions.  It’s not a traditional zoo as there’s no lions or elephants etc, but it’s still worth a visit nonetheless.  Brooklands is home to monkeys, meerkats, a large aviary, and a farm animal area.  It’s perfect for toddlers as it is ENCLOSED, so if you have a kid who likes to do a runner this is the place for you.  There are loads of picnic tables and a great playground.

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I’d like to have explored more of Pukekura Park on this visit, but my two kiddos were getting tired, so it will have to keep.

There are LOADS more free or frugal things you can do in or around New Plymouth, so if you are on a tight budget you can’t go wrong by spending your holidays here.

 

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Dollar Diet 2017: Week 37

money 2

Now I’ve finished a piece of work that was sucking most of my spare brain-power, I have more time again to devote to my blog and all things frugal.  This week I was stuck indoors with sick kids.  I thought we’d escaped the worst of what winter has thrown our way, but no, my tots seem to be catching everything just as the weather is warming up.

This week’s frugal happenings:

  • Made two batches of tortillas which I used for enchiladas and burritos.  Tortillas are seriously easy to make (it’s the cooking them that’s the time-consuming bit), and once you’ve had home made tortillas, you’ll never buy commercial ones again.  For the enchiladas I made the sauce from scratch too.  Yum!

 

  • Found a mint-condition Tinkerbell summer dress from Disney at a secondhand clothing store, which will make a perfect gift for my friend’s daughter who is turning 5 soon.  She is really into long, swishy dresses and this one fits the bill nicely.  The wrapping paper and card are, as usual,  handmade by my tots.

    party dress tots in tawhero

    Such a cute dress!

  • Stayed home most of the week.  This has been a self-enforced embargo on going out as my children came down with conjuctivitis.  It is doing the rounds here at the moment and is ridiculously contagious.  Anyway, saving my town from more pink eye saves me money on petrol and saves me from the temptation to spend.

 

  • Stocked up on basics that were on sale at the supermarket.  It’s not often I come away from a supermarket these days, saying ‘Wow! Great bargains today,’ but this happened to be a week where many of our regular groceries were heavily discounted.  Items like canned corn and tomatoes were 75c each, toothbrushes were 58c etc so I stocked up on as much as I could and still came in quite a bit under budget.

 

  • D won some headphones in a competition he entered quite randomly.  He already has a great pair so he sold them on for $130.  Apparently there’s quite a demand for decent gaming headphones, and the buyer was very happy with his purchase.

 

  • Purchased at $60 meat pack from one of our local butchers, which I’ve then divided up into 14 meals (some of which include our whanau* night, when we feed 5 adults and 4 children).  As we eat several vegetarian meals a week, I won’t have to buy meat for three or four weeks.  For NZ prices, this pack was a great deal, working out at just over $4 per meal.

 

  • D’s tax return finally showed up!  That is now salted away with other savings to help with our moving costs.  As we are moving islands (which requires taking our household goods and cars on a ferry), our moving costs will be in the thousands.

 

  • I made a batch of gluten-free date scones with baking mix left over from my 100th failed attempt to go gluten-free.  We have a GF family at my church, so I thought I’d surprise them with something nice for morning tea after the service.

 

  • Gave a bagful of grapefruit to friends.  I am not making grapefruit marmalade this year as we are likely to be moving soon and I am trying to take as little as possible with us.  I am really going to miss all the free fruit our garden provides us with!

 

  • We had several meatless meals, including baked potatoes, which D reckons are the best foodstuff ever invented.

 

Lest you think I am some sort of saint, I did splurge on some unwarranted things this week.  After several days inside my MIL offered to take both my tots for the afternoon.  I was so thrilled, I went to a cafe because I felt like I needed to celebrate!  It was wonderful to spend time without being whined at, or having to wipe snot or eye gunk.  I also went to a Tupperware party (for a friend’s birthday) where I came face to face with an old friend, their children’s tea party set.  My brother and I had one growing up which we LOVED.  I remember holding many, many tea parties in our shed.  The tea set wasn’t too expensive (I don’t usually buy Tupperware as I think it is outrageously overpriced) and I plan to stash it away to give to the kids as a joint present at Christmas.  So there you are, suckered in by nostalgia!

Image result for tupperware kids tea set

Who remembers this?  Ah, the colours of my childhood.

 

 

* whanau: (noun) extended family, family group, a familiar term of address to a number of people – the primary economic unit of traditional Māori society. In the modern context the term is sometimes used to include friends who may not have any kinship ties to other members.

 

 

 

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Effortless ways to save money

Effortless ways to save money tots in tawhero

I want what she’s having…

I am an avid reader of frugal blogs and articles about how to stretch my dollar further. Many ways to save money require time and effort, like cooking from scratch to de-cluttering and selling off your unwanted stuff.  I’m not averse to putting in my time or my effort to save money, but thanks to my AI disease I may not have the oomph required or I just don’t have the time.  But there are still loads of things we can do to save money without taxing our brain cells.

Here are some truly effortless, very-little-brain-power-required ways to save money:

  • Use a third or up to a half less sugar or cheese than indicated in a recipe
  • Likewise, swap out some milk for water in a recipe
  • In fact, use less dairy period.  Even here in New Zealand, the dairy capital of the world, the price of butter, cheese and milk is getting off-the-charts-ridiculous.  A word of caution though: many dairy-free recipes can still be costly because they use things like almond milk or coconut oil.  Search for depression-era recipes for cheaper dairy-free alternatives.  beverage, black-and-white, business
  • If you are a multiple cup of tea or coffee per day person, boil the water once, and make up a second drink in a travel mug (heck, if you use the same tea bag you probably won’t notice).  This way you save money on power and resist the temptation to buy a cup of coffee/tea if you’re out and about.  If you are going to be at home, pour the hot water into a thermos.  Now, if only I can remember where I put my thermos…
  • Drink water.
  • Switch off the lights in rooms that aren’t in use (I am CONSTANTLY doing this is my house, sigh).
  • Put your spare change into a piggy bank at the end of the day.  My brother (who is on a very limited budget) does this and is able to really treat himself every few months with these savings, which helps with the grimness of life on a benefit.  He regularly finds he’s saved $60-70 once his piggy bank is full.  White Piggy Bank on Brown Wooden Surface
  • Shut the fridge door as quickly as you can.  
  • If you are heating a room, shut the door! (My family, this one is for you!)  My kiddos, like everyone else’s, were born in a tent.
  • Don’t have time to use up that produce before it goes off?  Chuck it in the freezer.  Veggies can be added to soups and stews and fruit into smoothies.
  • Unplug appliances at the wall if they use standby power (e.g. microwave) or at the wall for appliances that don’t (e.g. toaster)
  • Reduce your portion sizes.  Experiment with how much food leaves you satisfied.
  • Put on warmer clothes if you feel cold, rather than switching on the heater.

    Put on your coat and hang out with a tree

  • Use less meat or include more vegetarian meals in your diet
  • Buy generic.  Supermarket own brands or budget brands usually come with significant savings, and many times these products are EXACTLY the same (often made in the same factory!) or they are indiscernible from the market leader.  I have certain brands that I prefer because of the taste or results they give, but you can bet I’ve tried all the generic alternatives first.  If it’s something I’m not picky about, like headache pills or canned tomatoes, I go for a generic brand every time. I use a generic brand moisturiser (of which I only need a tiny amount so it lasts for ages) and save hundreds a year.

    Women in Yellow Dress Holding Hands in Purple Grassland

    Buy generic so you have more time and money to hang out in lavender fields with your mates

  • Find a frugal alternative to your favourite-but-expensive recipes.  There are loads of copycat recipes out there.  I find it also helps to have a think about what it is you like about a certain meal.  I know for me, it’s often the sauce or the dressing!  My family loves to get fish and chips as a takeaway.  Recently we decided it was just the chips we love, so now we bake frozen, crumbed fish fillets at home while D nips off to buy the chips.  This saves us several dollars.
  • Use less.  Experiment with how little shampoo, soap, moisturiser etc that you can get away with.  You may not notice any difference if you reduce the ‘splonge’ of shampoo you regularly dish out to yourself.
  • Use it up!  Opening up toothpaste tubes, mayonnaise bottles, foundation tubes, moisturiser bottles etc to get the dregs at the bottom mean you really get your money’s worth.  I find when my moisturiser is getting low and won’t squirt out anymore, storing it upside down means I get another two or three weeks out of it!
  • When your spray cleaner is half empty, dilute with water.  I don’t notice any difference in its effectiveness.
  • When an old bulb blows out, swap it for an energy efficient one
  • Make extra dinner portions for an effortless lunch the next day.  The savings from making your own lunch instead of buying it can be huge.
  • Double or triple a baking recipe if you can squeeze the extra portions in the oven, or if it’s something that freezes well, like cookie dough.
  • Embrace the slow-cooker.  They will save you so much money!  Cheap cuts of meat become mouth-watering, and prep is minimal for many recipes.  My favourite curried chicken recipe requires no more effort than chucking whole pieces (because you can shred it later) of chicken into the slow cooker, along with a tin of coconut cream, a tin of tomatoes, and a few spices.  It takes me all of two minutes!  Roasting a chicken in the slow cooker takes me maybe 40 seconds as all it needs is rubbing with oil.  The added bonus of slow-cooked roast chicken is every single piece of chicken will fall off the bone so nothing is wasted.  Once everyone has eaten, I leave the carcass in the cooker with water, a few veges and some seaweed to make nutritious chicken stock.
  • If it’s a warm but not boiling hot day, switch off the air conditioner in your car and open the windows.  Free stock photo of road, traffic, man, person
  • Read your free community newspapers to find free or low-cost things to do in your area.  My city has cool events on almost every weekend, and they’re usually free.
  • Stay home!  If you’re bored and don’t know what to do with yourself look up lists like this and this for inspiration.
  • Unsubscribe from mailing lists for stores that are your kryptonite.  If you don’t know there’s a sale on in your favourite store, you won’t be tempted to spend.  Ditto group deal sites.
  • Do subscribe to mailing lists for stores that sell the essentials, so you know when the sales are on.  I stock up on winter coats and thermals for my kids a year ahead when these items are at rock-bottom prices (how weird is this saying, by the way?).
  • If you’re not already on Pinterest, sign up and create frugal ‘boards’ for tips and recipes.  You can find my frugal recipe board here.  When I’m out of inspiration or time when I’m meal planning, my Pinterest board comes in very handy.
  • If you are on a power plan that gives you a night rate, push the ‘delay start’ button on your dishwasher or washing machine so you can take advantage of it.  comfort, control, cooking

 

Share your effortless ways to save money below:

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Dollar Diet: Week 11, a frugal St Patrick’s Day celebration

This was not the most frugal week ever as we had not one, but two special occasions.

Isn’t that just typical?  Nothing much for ages, and then everything happens at once.  This year D and I decided to make a special deal out of St Patrick’s Day; and we were also privileged to see two beautiful people get married.  I had a great time at both events, enjoying the company of some of the people I love the most.  Special occasions can mean you spend more money than usual, but they don’t have to break the bank.

Green chrys

I got a huge bunch of green chrysanthemums for $3

Now I have a few kid-free mornings, I have more energy to entertain and to put more effort into celebrations.  I think celebrations and traditions are vital for families: they teach a child their family history, culture or religion; traditions help instil a sense of belonging, they help mark the passing of the year, and can bring generations together.

D and I are pretty intentional about what cultural or religious events we do or do not observe.  For instance, we don’t do Halloween, and Santa, the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy don’t visit our house.  But Christmas and Easter are still a big deal, so are Father’s Day, Mother’s Day and birthdays.  We also have our own traditions that are special to our family, like our family and whanau nights, breakfast in bed on your birthday, and Gordon ‘sandwiches’ (someone yells ‘Gordon sandwich!’and we all have a group hug).

This year we want to mark a few ‘Saint days’.  While St Patrick’s Day has largely morphed into a cultural holiday of craic and drinking rather than a religious observance, I am more than happy to mark this day, and for my children to learn about the life of St Patrick, and indeed, about other key figures in Christian history.

I put together a fun St Patrick’s Day party on a shoestring budget.  Here’s how I did it:

  • Make it potluck.  This is the norm in New Zealand fortunately!  I provided the main dish of Beef and Guinness stew, along with peas, green apple spritzer, and lime jelly.  As is often the way, we ended up with a feast.  Soda bread, scalloped potatoes, lamb, an all green salad, and several green desserts.                                                                green
  • Keep decorations simple.  I am not an OTT, decorate-anything-that’s-nailed-down sort of person, but I do like to put up a few special things to signify that it’s special event time.  I had some green card left over from Christmas cards my kids made, so I made some shamrock bunting.  I also found some lovely Irish blessings online, and put them up around the dining table.  Some green flowers reduced to clear were the finishing touch.  I decorated the children’s table with shamrocks and wrote their names on their place setting (Big hit!  Plus I strategically seated my son far, far away from my friend’s son who he likes to pick on, I dislike this phase).  The best thing is I can re-use the bunting and blessings in the years to come.
  • all set tots in tawheroblessingkids table tots in tawhero
  • Make it meaningful.  I spoke one of the blessings over the group as our grace before the meal.  After the meal we all sat down to watch the excellent BBC kid’s show Let’s Celebrate.  If you aren’t familiar with this show, it follows children as they celebrate cultural and religious holidays (They look at ALL faiths too, which I appreciate).  They have a great episode all about St Patrick’s Day which follows two girls in Northern Island as they get ready for the day.  Let’s Celebrate always goes into the history and meaning of each event, and this bit is acted out by kids.  It’s gorgeous!  You can watch the St Patrick’s Day video on YouTube here.  It wasn’t only the children who learnt a lot from this episode, many of our guests didn’t know much about St Patrick.
  • Unleash the craic!  I don’t think anyone does a party quite like the Irish.  To their credit, all our guests played along with my shenanigans.  We wores green, played Irish music in the background, D led us on the guitar in old-fashioned sing-a-long, and we played a hilarious ‘Minute to Win It’ game I found on Pinterest, called the Shamrock Shake (which I now can’t find to link to it, sorry).  Basically you fill a tissue box with balls (or plastic eggs in my case, which I have for Easter), tie it over your bottom, and shake, shake, shake to see who gets the most eggs out.  It was very funny, and even my 2 and a half year old got the gist of it.

     

I’m looking forward to next year already.

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Dollar Diet: Week 10, Use it up

This week was a very good week in our frugal Tawhero household.

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Sausage and Chip mucking about at Te Manawa museum, Palmerston North

A couple of bitterly cold mornings found me digging out our winter clothes, which then in turn sparked me to go through ALL my clothes.  I tossed some, ruefully packed some away that don’t fit because I’ve put on weight (gah!), and generally gave everything a good once-over.  I realised I had a serious ‘hole’ in my wardrobe – namely a decent pair of jeans that fit properly – so I toddled off to buy a pair.  I didn’t find anything second-hand, but I managed to get a great pair at one of our local stores and my loyalty card gave me 30% off.  I’m not quite sure how that happened as I hardly ever buy from that store, but I’ll take it!

The weird thing is, it’s like sorting out my wardrobe has given me a new lease on life.  It galvanised me into action, and I was a busy beaver most of the week, especially where saving a buck or two was concerned.

I woke up with a migraine on Wednesday (yay) and generally felt nauseous and yuck for almost the whole day.  I’d postponed whanau night, which then left me with the dilemma of having to cook.  It was very tempting to get a takeaway, especially as D wasn’t around that night, but I said to myself ‘nay young Angela, you’re on a Dollar Diet.  Gird your loins, girl.’ [I really do talk to myself like that, I swear.] I rifled through our freezer and was grateful that I almost always have a few heat and eat-type meals in stock.  Crumbed fish, I thank thee.

I was ruthless about eating at home and using up what we had.  When we ran out of bread on Friday (and it was too late to make some), I didn’t nip out to the shops to buy a loaf.  I whipped up a tuna pasta salad instead, easy-peasy.  I finally found a use for the tin of applesauce that had been sitting in our cupboard for ages (turns out your two-and-a-half-year-old will just love it and basically just eat that for his dinner).  Two bananas and half a pear that were starting to turn got baked into banana bread.  Slightly-manky-looking veg got thrown into a shepherd’s pie.

banana bread tots in tawhero

Only half the banana bread survived long enough to make it into the photo, RIP BB.

I’d bought two packets of malt biscuits (they were on special) as a treat for my children.  They turned up their nose at them because they like a different brand.  Toddlers!  No amount of persuasion worked and now I was stuck with two packets of biscuits that I wouldn’t eat myself (too sugary).  I did however have whanau night, our minister’s ordination (such a big deal, yahoo!), and my FIL and S-MIL come to visit, all within days of each other.  So I made my family’s fudge cake recipe that has been lovingly handed down from generation to generation.  Okay, so from my auntie to my brother and I…

Anyhow, it was a brilliant choice.  Fudge cake keeps well for several days, everyone loves it, and you can eke it out if you cut it into bite-sized squares.  One batch did all three occasions.

The kids and I had a grand outing this week, which barely cost us a cent.  My mother very generously paid for the tots and I to go to a Peppa Pig stage show over in Palmerston North.  It was so. much. fun.  I’m not sure who enjoyed it more, me or the kids?  Bing bong boo, I say!  The tots behaved beautifully – even though it was Chip’s first-time at a show.  Chip was obsessed with Daddy Pig, screaming with delight every time the porcine father appeared on stage.  It isn’t the sort of thing our budget normally allows, and I was very grateful to my mum for treating us.

We topped the day off with a trip to their favourite place in Palmy North, Te Manawa.  Te Manawa is a wonderful, free museum that is pretty much paradise to my children.  It is an incredible yes space, with so much that children can play with, sit on, create with and touch.

Te Manawa 2 Tots in Tawhero

One of the playrooms at Te Manawa

The weekend found us with two sick tots on our hands.  Sausage with a cold and Chip with a vomiting bug.  Such is the reality of life with two small children.  My MIL offered to watch them for a bit on Sunday afternoon.  I leapt at the chance to actually leave the house!  (Hello world, I missed you.) D and I went to the library, and then bought a drink and muffin each at a cafe, where we sat and read our books in blissful, sickness-free peace.  A lovely date!

reading party tots in tawhero

Reading party for two 

What frugal wins did you have this week? Chime in below

 

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Dollar Diet Week 9: Of Plums and Pancakes

After our extravagant holiday to Great Barrier Island, D and I recommitted to tightening our wallets.  Our holiday was two years in the planning, but even so, holidays have a way of making money slip through your fingers like water.

We have some short-term goals, like a possible wedding in Australia to attend (I have my fascinator at the ready, R…), saving for further studies/possibly moving towns, and a long-term goal of, well,  just saving as much as we can.

Despite a dentist bill, we had a pretty frugal week.

  • I made plum jam, which we enjoyed on pancakes for Shrove Tuesday.  Easter is a big deal in our house, and it was a fun way to signal the beginning of Lent with my tots.  I keep seeing pancake mix on special at my local supermarket, and throw my hands up in despair that such a product is even required (okay, so my hand-throwing is metaphorical, lest I be known as the crazy supermarket lady).  I mean, come on, pancakes are almost as easy as making toast.

plum panccakes tots in tawhero

  • I went pine cone gathering at a local pine-treed spot for us to use as kindling this winter.  The pine cones are an excellent source of fuel for our wood burner, and are absolutely free.  For 15 minutes worth of effort (which including scrabbling up a steep bank) I netted two bags of cones.  I’ll be going back for more.

pinecones tots in tawhero

  • We packed our lunches and snacks when out and about, and entertainment was our weekly whanau night, and an impromptu BBQ (with the same friends) at the Bason Botanic Gardens which have free gas BBQ’s for the public.                                                   Bason gardens tots in tawhero

 

  • I attended my local free gym a.k.a. the great outdoors.  At the moment I am relishing my kid-free mornings, and after I’ve dropped Sausage off at kindy I take the top track at Virginia Lake.  It takes me 30 minutes and is just like doing a HIIT workout as the track has very steep sections, undulating sections and quite flat sections too.  I come home in quite a sweat.  I don’t meet a lot of people on the track – which suits me fine as I like peace and quiet when I’m exercising – but I’ve been stunned by the number of elderly people who are on the track too.  I hope to be as sprightly when I’m their age!  The only downer is my faithful running shoes finally gave up the ghost after long service, and now I have the task of finding some that are actually decent.  Quality shoes are so hard to come by!  If you have any recommendations, do let me know.